Another insta-rec

Aug. 23rd, 2017 13:42
cesy: "Cesy" - An old-fashioned quill and ink (Default)
[personal profile] cesy
http://www.attitudeiseverything.org.uk/resources/practical-guides/access-information/ has a good summary of what a venue needs to do to be accessible to a basic range of disability needs. Places like Nine Worlds and lists like Euan's Guide go a lot further, particularly for neurodiversity and complex needs, but this is a great start and easy to understand for those who are new to the subject.
fairestcat: naked woman reading. vintage (Reading)
[personal profile] fairestcat
Since I last posted one of these I've spent a week at a pagan festival mostly reading and a week at a cottage on a lake mostly reading. So, I figured I'd better post before my read-but-not-crossposted list gets really out of hand.

Lots of Kris Ripper and Alexis Hall in this batch.

Breaking Down (Scientific Method Universe #4) - Kris Ripper ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

Ripper once again puts zir characters through the emotional ringer.

This time we get the aftermath of an offscreen sexual assault and a breakup that's painful for everyone involved. read more )

Roller Coasters (Scientific Method Universe #5) - Kris Ripper ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

This book really centers Will's struggles and insecurities about his place in Hugh and Truman's relationship, which is a thing I'd wanted (and Ripper had been working up to) for several books. read more )

The Boyfriends Tie the Knot (Scientific Method Universe #6) - Kris Ripper ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

So much going on in this book and it's all just fabulous. read more )

The Honeymoon (The Scientific Method Universe #7) - Kris Ripper ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

And with that the main arc about Will and Hugh and Truman's relationship comes to a perfect close. read more )

For Real - Alexis Hall ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

This is a fabulous BDSM romance between two characters with an 18-year age difference. I love that kind of thing, but if large age differences make you uncomfortable this book is not for you. read more )

The Art Of Three - Erin McRae & Racheline Maltese ★ ★ ★

A sweet, relatively low-drama poly romance. read more )

Spectred Isle (Green Men #1) - K.J. Charles ★ ★ ★ ★

An excellent beginning to a new series. While the romance is central and significant, this is above-all a well-built supernatural fantasy. read more )

Extremes (Scientific Method Universe #8) - Kris Ripper ★ ★ ★ ★

Short and incredibly intense. read more )

Silver Moon - Catherine Lundoff ★ ★ ★ ★

Menopausal werewolves! What's not to love? read more )

Glitterland (Glitterland #1) - Alexis Hall ★ ★ ★

There was a lot I loved about this book and a few things that really didn't work for me. read more )

Gays Of Our Lives (Queers of La Vista #1) - Kris Ripper - ★ ★ ★ ★

A charming romance with a delightfully disgruntled disabled protagonist. read more )

Aftermath (Glitterland #1.5) - Alexis Hall ★ ★ ★

A nice epilogue that ties up some dangling threads from the book, but I'm still just not in love with this couple.

Penric's Fox - Lois McMaster Bujold ★ ★ ★ ★

Probably my favourite of the Penric stories so far. Nominally a murder mystery, but there is only ever one obvious suspect. read more )

Sand and Ruin and Gold - Alexis Hall ★ ★ ★ ★

A disturbing and unsettling story about captivity and freedom and connection.

Romantic in its own way but decidedly not a romance.

In Vino - Alexis Hall ★ ★ ★ ★

Short story starring a secondary character from For Real, available for free for joining Hall's mailing list.

Fucked up, self-destructive asshole has fucked up, self-destructive and really ill-considered sex. It's like watching a train wreck. I really hot, decidedly kinky train wreck.

Fire Thief - Jordan Castillo Price ★ ★

Short story. Picked up as a first sample of a frequently-recced writer.

Enjoyable enough, but the way the love interest's disability was concealed and then revealed as if it were somehow shocking left me cold.

Shatterproof - Xen Sanders ★ ★ ★

I found this book frustrating. I liked it, but I really wanted to love it and I could just never get there. read more )

Daughter of Mystery (Alpennia #1) - Heather Rose Jones ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

I LOVED this book and I'm definitely looking forward to the next two books in the series.

Complicated, smart and constantly-surprising fantasy with a great lesbian romance. read more )

Heart of the Steal - Avon Gale & Roan Parrish ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

Well, that was completely delightful.

Philanthropist who dabbles in art theft meets cute guy at a party and decides to impress him with a gift of illicitly acquired art. Cute guy turns out to be an FBI Agent. Art Crimes divisions. Eh heh heh, oops? read more )

Prosperity (Prosperity #1) - Alexis Hall ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

I keep expecting the Prosperity series to be light and airy and vaguely fluffy. Airships! Skytowns! A street urchin named Piccadilly and a crime-lord named Milord! It sounds like the fluffiest of fluff. But it's so much more. It's also complex and tangled and so fucking honest about the complexity of love and emotion and connection. read more )

sharp

Aug. 22nd, 2017 22:19
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
Marja Vongerichten with Julia Turshen, The Kimchi Chronicles: Korean Cooking for an American Kitchen (2011)
Lauren Chun, The Kimchi Cookbook: 60 Traditional and Modern Ways to Make and Eat Kimchi (2012)

Read Vongerichten for a fusion tour. Read Chun to distinguish older and newer (she labels). Neither book could have existed without a family member: Vongerichten's three-star chef husband enabled the TV show on which the book rests, and Chun acknowledges the restaurant in which she was raised, though she doesn't trouble herself to credit by name the ajummas who labored in her mother's kitchen.

Both have a great grounding in writing and showing what one knows, however. Vongerichten is admirably matter-of-fact in crossing among the restaurants where she and Jean-Paul dined (thence recreated or adapted a dish), remembrances of her adoptive parents, and remembrances of her birth mother. She lived with the latter till she was three years old, then parted and re-met when she was grown. Chun studied law and worked as a wine buyer before returning to kimchi, the one thing her mother had warned her not to share with non-Koreans, which made me wonder whether we're of similar age; quite a few K Ams from the US West Coast have this story about their childhoods, without Chun's backing (or Roy Choi's) of restaurant-quality food.

(Japanese miso soup and ramen were acceptably exotic, but Japanese anything was protected by the coolness of their electronics during that mini-era. Korean food was nearly unknown even in southern California unless you lived right atop K-town or (where Chun was) Orange County's Garden Grove/Anaheim pocket. Otherwise, you were assumed Chinese, a situation aided by the fact that some Chinese restaurants served pickled cabbage, whether in their own right (northerly tradition) or because they were run by Koreans.)

Quick rec

Aug. 22nd, 2017 14:16
cesy: "Cesy" - An old-fashioned quill and ink (Default)
[personal profile] cesy
http://disabilityinkidlit.com/2016/07/08/introduction-to-disability-terminology/ is a rather good summary for people who are new to the topic, and does better with some of the controversial bits than many other 101 articles I've seen. I'm noting it down so I can point people to it in future.

fiber monday

Aug. 21st, 2017 08:35
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
* I wonder whether looking at patterns tagged "ballet neck" on Ravelry will yield results sufficiently different from patterns tagged "boat neck." The much-postponed Berenice meant for Reason is in there; so is this lovely cabled pullover, if I ever want to make something that'd be like wearing a warm blanket. Haven't looked comprehensively yet (hence the verb tense/mood).

* People talk about Ravelry for helping indie designers find audiences, encouraging beginner knitters/crocheters/weavers to tackle ambitious projects (community support), and so on. I've found it useful for being able to see how a certain garment fits a certain body without the social block of "Don't stare." That and looking around me while walking on university campuses and urban streets, for yeeeeears. But it's tricky, eh? because this cardigan model shares some of my proportions, and the cardigan doesn't look good on her. The thing is to figure out why, not to decide first off never to make a cardigan like that (though never-make is likely in this case). (And she can wear this well, but I couldn't because (a) her shoulders are straight, mine slope and (b) she has at least a handsbreadth more height in the torso than I. Heh.)

* This alteration tutorial made me chuckle. How do you know if you need to make a swayback alteration? Read more... )

Sparkler needs your support!

Aug. 19th, 2017 11:08
laceblade: Sasuke and Ponyo; Ponyo w/light over her head, expression gleeful (Ponyo: It's a light!)
[personal profile] laceblade
It's time for Sparkler's annual kickstarter to fund their next year of comics. They have 3 days left, and they're only a little more than halfway there. They're doing great work, and they need help.
Most of our content is free to read and stream, but a paid magazine membership lets you read ahead of the free serialization, download the content, and support the creators.

Sparkler Monthly is a multimedia, digital shojo/josei magazine of original English-language fiction. Our carefully selected creators are paid advances for their work and go through a thorough editorial process. After a book or audio story is serialized in the magazine, it’s bundled with bonus material and sold as ebooks, limited paperbacks, and/or CDs in the Sparkler Shop (similar to the magazine –> tankoubon system in Japan). In addition, our paperbacks and products can be found at a number of retailers; see our Retail & Libraries page on where to buy, and how to acquire books for your business or library.

The primary audience for Sparkler Monthly is girls and women aged 15 and up, or anyone interested in the rough ballpark of Female Gaze. Our four founders and most of our staff identify as female and are committed to promoting inclusive, fem-positive, and ridiculously fun content. We welcome creators of any gender and are particularly interested in entertaining, engrossing stories that tap into the variety and diversity of fandom.

This is a link to their Kickstarter campaign. The FAQ gives great advice if the options are overwhelming.

I love their content, from scripted audio dramas to comics to light novels. I love getting paperback copies of things I've tried online, so that I can more easily share them with other people.

If you've thought about supporting Sparkler or trying it out, now is the best [and, potentially only] time to do so.

in a house like this

Aug. 15th, 2017 21:05
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
*dashes in to c&p*
Ann Shayne, Bowling Avenue: A Novel (2012): extended reflection by single thirty-something protagonist upon recently deceased married, separated, and possibly adulterous older sister in Tennessee, with random anomie. So boring. The tickle of a romance arc goes exactly as expected, as does the community re-engagement of the protag.

Let's try that again. Shayne is half of the knit-blog duo behind Mason and Dixon (the other half, Kay Gardiner, lives in New York City), and their blog is a fine blog, yay. At some point I found Bowling Ave used for a dollar, a discard from King County's library system; when I visited King County for business, I took it along. And then---I assume that Shayne herself would have had little argument---I knitted during the plane-ride home instead of reading further.

Meanwhile, my airplane seat mate was reading (text-only, on her phone) a novel featuring the Voynich MS and Ashmole 782 which stars an investigator named Diana. Ah, the internet provides---part of a trilogy by Deborah Harkness. Diana is a witch, and some guy is a 1500yo vampire. Since they're het and Destined for reasons I didn't bother to look up, I guess it's better that the boy be the vampire, though only because that one character and that other character are relatively recent, whereas there are hundreds, probably thousands of years of evil lamia stories....

Anyone want a novel set in a sanitized version of pre-current-crush Nashville? (Between 2012 and a year or two ago, a bunch of artistic folk decided to move there or set up shop there. Now it's home to Fringe Association, Elizabeth Suzann, and so on and so forth.) I'll ship it for the cost of US postage. I doubt you'd want overseas postage, since as an ex-library copy it has a weighty plastic cover.
fairestcat: Bobbi Morse, a blonde woman standing in the rain, with a mask-like pair of glasses pushed up on her head (Bobbi Morse)
[personal profile] fairestcat
I'm really excited about this. I stepped outside my comfort zone and volunteered to write a monthly Column about Marvel comics over at Women Write About Comics.

My first post went up today and you can read it here.

This is my first time in a long time writing for an audience that isn't people I already know and I'm both nervous and excited about it. Mostly excited, I think. Ask me again when I have to put together my August post.

charcoal and pine

Aug. 9th, 2017 22:09
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
Helie Lee, Still Life with Rice (1997): fictional memoir---that is, after a preface of her own (troped) self-discovery, Lee writes what she knows and has filled in of her grandmother's life in the first person. This is formally a novel. Baek Hongyong, b. 1912, grew up near P'yongyang in a post-yangban household with two younger sisters. The narrative carries us through their respective marriages, the removal of her immediate household to Manchuria towards the end of the peninsular occupation, their return to the peninsula after WWII's end, their sudden deprivation by the nascent communist government north of the 38th parallel, and Baek's eldest daughter's removal to the US with small Helie (late 1960s).
Read more... )

No, I've absolutely no clue why I read this and The Plum Tree simultaneously. Happenstance re: when I heard of each, but layering them into a hairshirt-like blanket may've been a bit much. The next readings are lighter.

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ahorbinski: shelves stuffed with books (Default)
Andrea J. Horbinski

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