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Jul. 21st, 2017 08:13
cesy: "Cesy" - An old-fashioned quill and ink (Default)
[personal profile] cesy
More things I have learnt from physio - mainly notes to self. I suspect [personal profile] hagar_972 and [personal profile] taennyn may have useful experience here, where I'm just starting out on the same journey they've already been on.

Muscles in the thigh - VMO, lateralis, the big quad one, the sartorius one across, adductors on the inside, abductors on the outside. VMO needs extra strengthening due to hypermobility. The small stabilising muscles tend to give up, then the big muscles compensate, and that's why my hamstrings get tight all the time. Then the hip/bum ones like glute max and glute mede also need help, particularly the latter.

Making sure things activate in the right order is hard. If the lateralis activates before the VMO instead of at the same time, then my kneecap slides sideways and that's one of the reasons it hurts. Trying to activate the VMO first will retrain it so they both go at the same time.
fairestcat: Dreadful the cat (Default)
[personal profile] fairestcat
For those who don't know, we live in an up/down duplex. Marna, Ian and I live upstairs and Lorayne has the downstairs, with two spare rooms for any guests of upstairs or downstairs.

Lorayne also has two window AC units. One of which is in her big spare bedroom. We do not have any AC upstairs, just a lot of fans.

It's been hot and humid as fuck in Ottawa for the last week. It's finally starting to cool down, but the heat is really lingering upstairs. Last night I couldn't fall asleep because of it.

So, I said fuck it and am sleeping downstairs tonight.

Dreadful followed me downstairs and was staring forlornly out the screen door, so we invited him in. So, Dreadful's sleeping downstairs too tonight.

Rayne's cats, Kina and Chakra, are less than impressed.

They've met Dreadful before, and even lived with him for a week when we stripped the wainscotting in the kitchen several years ago, so we're not worried it'll come to blows overnight or anything. They'll cope. And I think Dreadful is enjoying the change of scenery.

Also, the lack of dog.

Oh yeah, we got a dog. We've had him for about a month. Our intent was to foster him, but Marna fell in love, so now he's ours.

His name is Bogart, we think he's some sort of pointer cross, but he was rescued from the Everglades, so we can't be sure. He's about 18 months old and weighs about 40 pounds. He's a sweetheart, but he has some behavioral issues we're working on.

And Dreadful has NOT reconciled himself to this new family member yet. He's never lived with a dog before, and he's not sure he wants to now. They're cohabiting relatively peacefully, but Dreadful is still keeping his distance.

ETA: and then Kina and Dreadful got in a fight in the hallway. So much for not coming to blows. So, now they're locked on opposite sides of the dog gate for the night.

*sigh*
fairestcat: naked woman reading. vintage (Reading)
[personal profile] fairestcat
As promised, some books I've read:

Point of Hopes (Astreiant, #1) - Melissa Scott & Lisa A. Barnett -
★★★★

Complicated mystery plot in a fascinating, intricately-crafted fantasy universe.

I really appreciated the casually mainstreamed queerness in the worldbuilding. read more )

The Ruin of a Rake - Cat Sebastian - ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

This book has everything I loved about Sebastian's previous books. Complicated, flawed and messily human characters, a clear-eyed and intelligent class analysis and a refreshingly unapologetic queerness. read more )

Point of Knives (Astreiant #1.5) - Melissa Scott - ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

A satisfying mystery with an even-more-satisfying beginning of a romance between the main characters as they transition from people who sleep with each other occasionally to people who'd like to have a romantic relationship with each other. read more )

Peter Darling - Austin Chant ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

An amazing queer, trans reimagining of the Peter Pan story. read more )

The Horse Mistress: Book 1 - R.A Steffan - ★ ★ ★

Enjoyable poly fantasy with a genderqueer protagonist. read more )

A Boy Called Cin - Cecil Wilde - ★ ★ ★ ★

I'd describe this book as an aspirational romance. It's a delightful, cozy fairytale of an idealized relationship. And that's not a bad thing. I think there's value particularly in queer aspirational romances. read more )

There Will Be Phlogiston (Prosperity, #5) - Alexis Hall ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

I picked this up because it was free and I'd heard good things about the author, but honestly I was mostly expecting a smutty, poly diversion.

What I got was so much more. read more )

Chasing Cameron: the complete series - Hanna Dare - ★ ★ ★ ★

A series of m/m novellas with a lot of sex, not all of it between, or only between, the two protagonists.

I was really pleasingly surprised by how non-mononormative this series is. read more )
fairestcat: Dreadful the cat (Default)
[personal profile] fairestcat
One of the benefits of the new mood-stabilizer is that I'm reading again. After reading my way through a shit-ton of fanfic, I'm now switching between fanfic and pro novels.

I'm mostly only interested in reading queer stories at the moment, which has meant a lot of queer romances and also SF/F with queer characters and relationships.

I started with everything ever written by KJ Charles and OMG was that a good choice. Her stuff is AMAZING. Highly, highly recommended. She writes m/m historical romances, some straight historicals, some fantasy. One of the things I love historical queer romances because I love reading about queer people in history being happy, and Charles' books totally fill that desire.

A lot of queer historicals, or at least a lot of the ones I've read, are really interested in class and the intersection of class and sexuality and how that impacts relationships. Class differences are at the heart of almost all of Charles' books and it makes for a great lens through which to look at the various historical periods she writes in. The other thing that makes me happy about her books is that very few of her protagonists are uncomfortable with or tortured about their sexuality, which is again really refreshing to read about.

Then I moved on to Cat Sebastian's regency romances which I also highly recommend. Again with the queers being happy and not angsting about their sexualities and again with the class and anxiety about class differences being a significant factor in all the relationships.

I also highly recommend Joanna Chambers' Enlightenment series, in which one of the characters is quite guilty about his sexuality, which is possibly more realistic, but doesn't appeal to my id in quite the same way.

It was at about this point in my dive into books again that I got myself a Goodreads account, which is here, and started actually reviewing stuff as I read it.

Several people I read here regularly post reviews of the books they've read on their journals, and I think I'm going to start being one of them, I'm not going to commit to any specific schedule, but expect semi-regular book posts (the first going up directly after I finish writing this post).

The other thing I'm loving about Goodreads is having a place a list of books I've been recced that look interesting. I'm almost entirely reading digitally these days, mostly on Kobo. So, when I want to read something new I can go to my Goodreads to-read shelf and see what strikes my fancy. There are a lot of books with poly relationships in there right now, because I specifically solicited recs for queer, poly stories on twitter.

If you're curious my to-read shelf is here, and I'm always taking recs. Nothing too serious or dense right now, I'm still easing my way back into this reading gig.

sippin' cuervo with no chaser

Jul. 18th, 2017 20:52
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
Yoon Ha Lee, Ninefox Gambit (2016): usually I have trouble finding a title for a book post. This time, three came to mind: the one I've used, "the tactics of mistake," and "experimental procedures." Anyway. Kel Cheris begins as captain of a unit that gains strength and combat benefits from keeping rigorously in formation. After she attempts to solve a losing scenario creatively---and heretically---she's disgraced, but a bit more creative thinking makes her abruptly into a brevet general, the host-body to a dead mass murderer, Shuos Jedao. (Consider that many heads of units in wartime are mass murderers; though it isn't glorified here, it is ...quite present.) Kel command wants Cheris to subdue a heretical outbreak and retake the Fortress of Scattered Needles. Sort of. Well, the hexarchate, of which the Kel are one-sixth, doesn't like heretics because it messes with their calendar, but everyone (except Cheris, at first) is playing an extremely long game. Pass the metaphorical popcorn.
a bit more--not destructively spoilery (I think one cannot discuss this book at all without being *slightly* spoilery) )

As for this subject line, you know, don't you?

If you'd prefer an actualfax review to my untidy noodlings, try James Nicoll's, and if you don't mind implied spoilers for how Gambit wraps, here's his review of book two.

fiber monday

Jul. 16th, 2017 20:04
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
Though I don't remember which day, I taught myself from books to knit about ten years ago this month (and to crochet ~21 years ago likewise). yay.

The ghost shawl has been bound off and washed, and its upper edge has been reinforced. Reason adores its colors and shape, whereas I feel awkward however I drape it, but it seems a bit too nice for her current age. Pondering. In any case, its shape---a triangle so wide and springy that one could block the upper edge as a curve or V---is instructive when tied onto me or Reason: if I ever knit Shore Hap, as I mean to, I'll need to enlarge it. Shore Hap's span is given as 125 cm = 50 in; the ghost as knitted is ~6'6 = nearly 2 m across. Even so, my sticklike and short torso can barely tie on the ghost shawl in the Shore Hap photo's manner. Inconvenient shoulders, again---but I'm learning. (Someone with my shoulder circumference "ought" to be much taller for something the ghost shawl's shape/size.)

Viajante's yarn ball is too large for my business trip. Heh. It's the size of a small adult head---1600 m = 400 g at fingering weight. When I have a 32L-capacity daypack (a bit under 2000 in3), I don't want to choose between yarn and some me-compatible snacks. Instead, the current office project will travel (Rendezvous), since it's in the first of its slated two 100g skeins. Its complexity is restrained by my having placed a marker every other motif-repetition; at least it's motif-driven, not two long segments of lace to either side of a center stitch. Those are my two projects on wooden circular needles---that's the other consideration, of course, wood needles short enough to pass muster as non-weaponry. Who knows whether Rendezvous will be large enough for the shoulders of doom, frankly, but I chose the largest size for which I have yarn....

The cardigans are on hold due to summer heat, though I ought to start my mother's soon regardless. Lena is about 15 cm high---round and round we go.
naraht: Chris Froome and Peter Sagan chatting (other-HelloFroomey)
[personal profile] naraht
I've been feeling inexplicably unwell so I finished work early this afternoon and spent it lying on the couch watching the Tour de France...

• One of Britain's top cyclists from the 80s, Philippa York, has just publicly come out as trans during the Tour. Apparently she had been avoiding public life for some years, but people in the know were aware that she'd transitioned. What's heartening is that the reception from the cycling world has, as far as I can tell, been extremely supportive. She's been guest commentating on ITV for a few stages now, and I haven't heard a single stumble over name or pronouns. Chapeau, Philippa. It must have taken a lot of courage.

• David Millar gets so into the tactics. You get the feeling that he doesn't care so much who wins (or does a good job of covering it up, unlike Carlton Kirby, who has his crushes), but he gets passionately angry if he disagrees with a team's choices: "why are they doing that??!? It's ridiculous! What are they trying to achieve???"

Yet when Ned Boulting asked, he heartily and believably denied having any desire to be out on the mountain himself: "no, no, a thousand times no."

• I've managed to get my parents into watching the Tour. They're both backing Froome. What did I do to deserve this?

• As always, a special thanks is due to whoever at ITV does the end-of-show montages. They are always superbly on point and they almost always choose great music. Today I owe them particular thanks for introducing me to the music of Jacqueline Taïeb, a French singer of Tunisian origin from the 60s.

Apart from being a great song, Bravo just makes me think of the "Carlien Daten?" saga. (Spoiler: after the date they "decided to just be friends.")

I don't get the feeling that Taïeb pities (or particularly respects) the hero, though perhaps I'm reading too much into it...

(French lyrics)



• ETA: What have I learned from the Orica Backstage Pass so far? That Esteban Chaves is reading a Danielle Steele novel and that (unrelatedly) Matt Hayman has had to explain to him what a "bromance" is.

Wheelchair recs

Jul. 13th, 2017 19:22
cesy: "Cesy" - An old-fashioned quill and ink (Default)
[personal profile] cesy
Your first wheelchair by [personal profile] kaberett was brilliant for helping me upgrade from Shopmobility's hire chair to something designed for active use and being pushed by the person in it rather than a carer.

The Spinal Cord Injury Empowerment Project by the University of Washington has excellent videos on wheelchair skills. The American accent and cheery tone grates after a while, but it's very useful info and nicely bite-sized.

Some Fanworks

Jul. 13th, 2017 09:58
laceblade: Chibi Tomoyo blushing with eyes downcast, hands clutching face (CCS: Tomoyo overcome)
[personal profile] laceblade
Halfway Away, a vid for Yuri!!! on Ice by [personal profile] starlady
This is just such sweet vid, and makes me feel overcome by all the feelings I had when watching the show as it aired. That it's an excellent song choice doesn't hurt, either.

Field Work, a vid for the Indiana Jones series by [personal profile] eruthros
I will never look at Indiana Jones the same way again.


For the first time this year at WisCon, there was a drabble challenge, with results posted in a collection at the AO3: WisCon 41 Drabbles.
I particularly enjoyed the drabbles by [archiveofourown.org profile] j00j and [archiveofourown.org profile] TheAndy, but am probably biased because they are friends.

It's a small collection, but one of high quality, and I hope that they do it again next year. The idea of collecting works created in the same physical location, over a specific period of time, is pretty cool. Also, I was at the Best Superpowers for Banging panel, which inspired the "Lube Jets" drabble. To say that the panel was hilarious feels like an understatement.

huh, a meme

Jul. 12th, 2017 21:12
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
from a locked post

Read more... )
naraht: Chris Froome and Peter Sagan chatting (other-HelloFroomey)
[personal profile] naraht
I did actually laugh out loud at this one. I love these guys. Can they be a Yuletide fandom?

some things

Jul. 10th, 2017 20:52
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
* In a summary of a promotional event about Dai Gyakuten Saiban 2 which was translated into English (DGS is a sibling game-sequence to Ace Attorney), there's mention of specific changes made for internationalization. Increasingly, "internationalization" is only anglicization, which makes sense financially but saddens me: this isn't like choosing a primary language for scientific scholarly communication. I remember being surprised to find that Maya likes hamburgers, and yeah, turns out it's miso ramen.

* I've begun keeping a food log (at partner's encouragement, nay, near-insistence) to help with tracking my body's protests, whether allergenically based or otherwise. It makes me grumpy. There have been a few other causes for grumpiness during the past week.

* OTOH, I've actually reached 80% in the novel I want to be reading, skimmed a fictionalized memoir (to avoid DNFing outright) and some scholarly essays that need to return to a library, and placed a library hold for Elliott's forthcoming Buried Heart. Though I'm wary of building too much of a queue, Las Anclas is nearby, too, assuming that my luck holds.

* It's funny that I used to read more while living in a pressure-cooker. Having less dayjob stress has mostly made it possible to take a weekend nap without guilt. My eldest aunt says that my third-eldest cousin (her second child) and I have (had) the same basic issue, an immune system splayed upon the floor---that's not her phrasing, translated or otherwise---and has suggested a remedy, which is agreeable enough for me to undertake. I'll forgo the impostor syndrome that accompanies the link, since that cousin teaches at Ewha University and I've only parlayed my insufficient fitness for playing professor into a couple of career hard-resets. She meant it kindly, anyway. I hope it doesn't take me equal time to recover from the dayjob I left a year ago, or I'll spend the remainder of my forties grasping after a better baseline; I was there for a bit over a decade.

* Manuscript illumination as a living practice. So good.

* A thesis I haven't read, on ki suryŏn as reconstructed tradition; ki suryŏn's Chinese reflex is qigong, perhaps a more recognizable term. Mostly I'm happy that someone somewhere has tackled this type of reinvention of pastness. I know something about inventio by medieval writers in Britain, and I'd surmised it for twentieth-century East Asia but lack the evidence to back it. The thesis's writer has had an interesting life so far: she's an ethnic Korean born in Leningrad as was, who finished secondary school and took a law degree in Jerusalem, then completed a master's degree at Sungkyunkwan; since then a doctoral student and a teacher of Korean as well as Russian topics in Den Haag.

Netflix, god why.

Jul. 10th, 2017 20:45
inkstone: Rurouni Kenshin's Yahiko & Misao smacking their heads (facepalm)
[personal profile] inkstone
I've gotten so spoiled by Crunchyroll and FUNimation, which give me nice simulcasts of currently airing anime. So much so that I've forgotten how to look for fucking fansub torrents. I don't think I've looked for them in years! Never mind the fact that Crunchyroll and FUNimation kind of decimated fansub groups due to making currently airing anime available so easily. To be clear, I'm not really complaining about this. The industry complains about piracy. I say that you fight piracy by making it easier to obtain legal copies. People are lazy. I am lazy. I'm happy to fork over a monthly subscription fee so I can watch current anime in one place via my PC, Roku, phone, tablet, etc.

I am, however, complaining about fucking Netflix, which licensed Kakegurui (based on the female gambling manga I raved about on Twitter a couple years back) and decided to... wait until the season is over and drop it in one completed batch? Okay, like, I get this is their brand. Binging is Their Thing. But learn a little something about your fucking audience! Anime fans do not want to wait a month after the entire season is over to watch the entire series at once! We want to watch the series one episode per week! THAT IS HOW OUR FANDOM WORKS.

Ugh. I am so resentful that I'm having to pirate this show. I'm happy to support it, but I'm also not waiting until October or November to watch it! Jesus, the show has no chance of blowing up because of this. None. Literally none. Anime fans will be moving onto new and shiny fall anime by then!

NETFLIX WHY.

fiber monday

Jul. 9th, 2017 21:13
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
* Having realized that Reason has enough outer layers in her current size and possibly the next one, I've undone the second orange cardigan-in-progress, heh. (I try to cackle in rl every time I ravel a significant chunk of knitting.) Realistically, in the current pattern size it'd fit her through the coming spring at best, whereas I have enough yarn to make a 2018–2020ish cardigan. Here's to Sparsamkeit and practical making.

It's possible that knitting and unknitting things is not terribly practical, but I continue regarding the making of good-quality yarn as more effort than what I contribute to the overall process. Also, TBH, because my patience is finite and her acting up by hitting/biting/kicking occasionally (mostly just me, not her agemates and rarely another family member) is not finite so far, it's a way of postponing something she wants without lengthening further the period during which I knit nothing at all for her direct benefit. As petty reactions go, I think mine is confined fairly.

Thus she'll have her requested handwarmers (wrist-plus-armwarmers really) for this winter instead, and the completed See the Sea shawl plus the big-kid winter hat I've made already. My mother's cardigan is more important this year. My random interruptions of illness have been persuasive in reducing plans somewhat, too.

* Status: ghost shawl has been knitted except for the picot bind-off, but it needs an edging along the diagonal where I carried other colors. I dislike picots in both knit and crochet forms, so I'll crochet a bit along the diagonal edges; the current endeavor is to crochet a non-picot bind-off. hmph.

I've also added a bit to the ___Sand Cardigan and Lena. For the sake of rare upcoming business travel, I've begun Viajante. (Both Lena and Viajante are straightforward for long chunks, but Lena would break my don't-make-clothing-in-public rule.) Re: Viajante, it's nice to make something where 4000+ knitters have preceded you: I've sifted enough project notes to feel confident in modifying the vaguely conical shape for wide shoulders and a relative lack of height. Though my height's average, the designer is a North Sea German.
naraht: Chris Froome and Peter Sagan chatting (other-HelloFroomey)
[personal profile] naraht
Is this Tour proving to be really interesting, really boring, or both? Possibly both. Mostly I wonder whether there's anyone actually left in the race at this point.

Spoilers through stage 9 )

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ahorbinski: shelves stuffed with books (Default)
Andrea J. Horbinski

May 2016

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