quick meme

Sep. 20th, 2017 15:07
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
from Facebook, albeit via a DW friend, because I'm sick:

Read more... )
naraht: (Default)
[personal profile] naraht
nothing gold can stay (2628 words) by Naraht
Chapters: 1/?
Fandom: Yuri!!! on Ice (Anime)
Rating: Teen And Up Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Yuri Plisetsky & Victor Nikiforov, Yuri Plisetsky & Yakov Feltsman, Lilia Baranovskaya/Yakov Feltsman
Characters: Yuri Plisetsky, Victor Nikiforov, Yakov Feltsman, Lilia Baranovskaya
Additional Tags: Rivals, Post-Canon, Growing Up, Coming of Age, growth spurt, Injury, 2018 Winter Olympics, Aging
Summary: Yuri Plisetsky will never step out of Victor's shadow. Not if Victor has anything to do with it.

Or, the epic Nikiforov/Plisetsky rivalry in the run-up to the 2018 Games.



Here it is, the long one. The first chapter of the long one, at least.

A friend tells me that 'rage-filled teenage boy athlete' is not my usual aesthetic – probably an understatement! But it's a refreshing change in writing terms, and it's good to stretch yourself... right?

US politics

Sep. 20th, 2017 09:33
cesy: "Cesy" - An old-fashioned quill and ink (Default)
[personal profile] cesy
Hope not Hate is coming to the US, to counter the rise of international hate groups. American friends, you can sign up here.

river ganseys

Sep. 19th, 2017 21:34
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[personal profile] thistleingrey
Penelope Lister Hemingway, River Ganseys: Strikin' t'loop, Swaving, and Other Yorkshire Knitting Curiosities Revived from the Archives (2015): the thesis that winds through it is that ganseys (a set of ways for making pullovers) are an emanation of the Industrial Age, late C18 into the English Regency. It needed better editing than its tiny indie press could offer. Half is heavily personalized historical overview---whenever we meet her ancestors in the historical record, she points it out even if there's no family account to add to what records indicate; half is howto.

On p. 70, near the end of a chapter on nineteenth-century knitting in Yorkshire schools, prisons, and homes, Hemingway implies that being taught to knit in school according to a curriculum is what led to holding the needles "British" style (I've always heard "English" and have no idea how Welsh, Scottish, Cornish, or indeed Manx knitters may have tended to position their hands). At home, she says, they'd probably continued the older manner of "holding needles under fists" and throwing the yarn "continental" style. Interesting, though because there aren't enough trappings of scholarly approach, I have no idea whether Hemingway was able/interested in scholarly due diligence....

She suggests that the cables aren't mirrored in ganseys because of an old fear of mirrored reflection; she describes green as the forbidden color on account of "creation/god" (p. 92), though I know it as fairy-color from medieval texts. (Or any number of other things, including Buchan's Witch Wood.) In any case, vanishingly few bird motifs on ganseys, either.

ObContemporaryRetake: Seascale and Ardmore fall into one basket; Rocquaine and Guernsey make another.

fiber monday

Sep. 17th, 2017 20:59
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
___Sand is shelved until my mother's cardigan has been finished. Having put myself more or less on deadline for my mother's cardigan and the pi shawl (how is the weather fall-like already?), I found the next day that I needed something more portable than a cardigan and less fussy than the pi shawl. (I worry that carrying the shawl around would fuzz up its yarn.) For back-to-school night I've cast on my sage/off-white Herbarium, and its one small ear will sit in a bag until the next time I need something easy. For back-to-school night I've also written a sentence about something I did in first grade (visit the local library once a week, every week) and drawn a quick picture to accompany it: minus ten potential knitting minutes. :P

(Who knows whether she'll even wear her cardigan---she hasn't worn the poncho that she requested and I knitted two years ago---but this pattern is loose enough to fit me, too, though the sleeves would be short. We currently wear the same storebought shirt size but with different proportions at each point. Anyway, Reason wants like burning to inherit this cardigan despite being too small for it now, and I've been bidden not to rip it back.)

I've realized that for the paired indigo-cochineal shawls, the two colorways are too similar to make the bicolor mosaic motif "pop" properly. There's a US source that sells both Hespa---though not in the colorways my mother has bought---and conventionally dyed Ístex. I've made my best guess at one skein for just the mosaic rows; the stripes that frame them can use the gifted yarn and be a bit patchy. My stash included a bit of Ístex einband already, so it was clear upon meeting the Hespa skeins that they use the same yarn base.

some things

Sep. 17th, 2017 15:26
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
* I may not have finished watching Damo, but parts of its soundtrack (and the Tearliner contributions to Coffee Prince's OST, esp. "Go Go Chan") have been great for lulling an overextended child to sleep. In infancy, the title track in its oboe-solo iteration; now, as long as I don't use it often, the semi-power ballad "Bi ga." heh. If the fingers slip in choosing a track, just catch "Fate" before it gets going---not so restful.

* A week after Irma had passed him, my father declared that all was well except for how much the media had lied to everyone to let supermarkets drive prices up for water and supplies. I informed him that he was lucky and changed the subject. His electrical power is still out, but somehow that has nothing to do with whether the radio's weather announcer lied.

#notalloctogenarians but they sure sound like five-year-olds sometimes. No doubt the contrast would be less inviting if I weren't able to compare numerous six- and seven-year-olds of my acquaintance favorably to my father, eh? I'm aware that sometimes people just never "grow up." He did; I remember. It's a blessing that he doesn't remember what he's lost and losing---that would be harder all around.

Meanwhile, the same phone chat made it clear that he's become able to sympathize with his incomplete picture of my health issues/concerns because partner has talked with him about them. Doesn't matter what I say. But I understand a bit better now how he failed to comprehend my mother's illness with Bell's palsy for two years, longer than most people suffer it, since she had no rest or help. Then they divorced, which should've happened sooner, and her life improved. That part is years and years ago, during my early twenties.
Crawl back under your rock of self-estrangement

* It is difficult to use the internet to research specific remedies and palliative measures (for me) without swimming forever amidst groundless hearsay. Bring back 1997. (Not really.)

Yuletide nominations and stuff

Sep. 14th, 2017 20:54
naraht: (other-Yuletide squee)
[personal profile] naraht
How can the Yuletide season be starting already? Usually I'm on top of these things but this year I was caught without even a potential nominations list.

So, in a fit of absence of mind, I have nominated:

Return to Night - Mary Renault
Hilary Mansell
Julian Fleming
Lisa Clare
Elaine Fleming

Figure Skating RPF
Evgeni Plushenko
Stéphane Lambiel
Johnny Weir
Evan Lysacek [not so attached to him, does anyone have someone they'd like me to nominate instead?]

Cycling Commentator RPF
David Millar
Ned Boulting
Carlton Kirby
Sean Kelly [ditto... does anyone want Gary Imlach or Matt Stephens or Brian Smith?]

I'll be in North Wales for work tomorrow (!) and staying into Saturday for a mini-break, so I thought it was best to get things tided away now, lest I forget.
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
Ha Jin, A Map of Betrayal (2014): it was on the virtual endcap; the OverDrive landing page for one of my near-enough library systems featured it. Um. The novel opens with a fifty-something professor who uses a Fulbright term in China to investigate and reconstruct her dead spy father's first marriage. The narrative splits most chapters in two---first father, then daughter---though the whole thing struggles to avoid protracted didacticism. On one hand, it's a great opportunity for historical analysis as well as a good puzzle: how do you write a fictional secret history of a topic about which most readers know less than nothing?

On another hand, I agree with this stranger, who seems to have a stronger basis than I for similar views: the whole undertaking in which Lilian uncovers her father's past by talking with random Chinese people to whom she is introduced hopscotch-wise is a crock. Read more... )

Unlike the linked reviewer, I like father Gary's unsympathetic nature, one of the few things that gels for me here. War and spying are hard. Books need antiheroes sometimes.

fiber monday

Sep. 10th, 2017 19:42
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
I have wondered at times whether the influence of German upon Japanese fibercrafts goes the other way. (For G --> J, consider crocheted or knitted "cafe curtains," which may also be machine-knitted.) There's knitted garment evidence of J --> G, but Ravelry is only one echo chamber, as it were. Now I see a sewing pattern for a smock, designed by a German person, which is vaguely mori/yama-girl compatible as a loose first or second layer and which is called FrauAiko, Mrs. Aiko. Aiko is a legit Japanese given name---Reason knows one, my mother knows another, so it spans generations nicely as well---but it's also a (generally northerly) German name or partial name (prototheme), as in one, two. Clever.

(Is "Frau" used by age at present, or is it reserved for married women? It's moved at least once within my lifetime.)

Status: looks like ___Sand's half-knitted collar will amount to a skein and a half (50g skeins), and then there'll be icord without end, amen. Pi shawl has resumed forward motion after the heat has let up a bit, though it's still 30 C = 86 F in my house right now, after sunset.

My mother has returned from her travels with some lovely einband yarn dyed with cochineal and indigo. Now I seem to be on the hook for not one Herbarium shawl but three, and Reason and my mother can be purple-pink twinsies next year 8-| while I retain my plan of off-white x pale sage. (The first of the pair has become the new office project, since two Tidblads at once is boring.) Cochineal á íslensku is kaktuslús koshinelle, according to the yarn label, jartulitað: cactus-louse cochineal, earth-dyed? Not sure about jartu-.

postscript to prior things

Sep. 10th, 2017 11:14
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[personal profile] thistleingrey
Juniper: victory, if you adjust (as I must) for these:

Read more... )

ION, my 3yo desktop machine, which has already had its power supply replaced under warranty (which led to time-consuming shenanigans re: software license keys), makes a little grinding noise every time I turn it on. Hmmmm. The warranty expired 5 Sept 2017. :P Since I no longer have a professional need to run InDesign or oXygen with large data files and am increasingly unlikely to play more than one big PC game every two years, I'm pondering whether its eventual successor will be a laptop, which'd use less electricity. Does anyone have recs or cautions for recent, non-Apple laptops of small-business caliber? The one thing I always splurge on is RAM, to make a machine become obsolete more slowly; "home" machines are ruled out when you start with 16 GB. (I do still run oXygen sometimes, and now I use IntelliJ.) I've liked Dell and Lenovo laptops in the past, and Toshiba a long time ago.

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Andrea J. Horbinski

August 2017

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